Book Tag: The Classic Book Tag

Book Tag: Classic Book Tag, blog post by Aspasia S. Bissas
Photo by Suzy Hazelwood on Pexels.com

It’s been a while since my last book tag, and as an English major, this one is right up my alley. Between required reading for school and personal interest, I’ve read more than my fair share of classics. Unfortunately, looking back, I now realize they were written by mostly British (or Canadian/American) white men (and a few women). Pretty sad. I hope schools have since expanded their definition of classic lit to include more women, more world lit, and a lot more authors of colour. I’ve been working on improving the diversity of my reading material, but I know I still have a long way to go. I think we all have a lot of reading to catch up on…

(By the way, this tag was snagged from A Geek Girl’s Guide. Feel free to post it on your blog, or share your thoughts in the comments below.)

A classic you read in school

Surprisingly, I couldn’t get into Hamlet like I did with other Shakespeare works I read, until I saw a screen adaptation. Then it finally came to life for me. I guess sometimes you really need to see a play being performed.

Book Tag: Classic Book Tag, blog post by Aspasia S. Bissas

A classic you read outside of school

Read it, loved it, recommend it. Dumas has a very readable and engaging style of writing.

Book Tag: Classic Book Tag, blog post by Aspasia S. Bissas

A classic you didn’t finish

It’s probably debatable whether Gone with the Wind is still considered a classic, but it was when I read it. It’s also the only classic I can remember not finishing. For what it’s worth, Mitchell is a good writer and GwtW is interesting, if cringe inducing. The funny thing is that I stopped reading it only a couple of pages from the end. I have no idea why I didn’t just finish it, but I think it was because I’d seen the movie around that time and I already knew how it ended. I guess Rhett didn’t give a damn and neither did I. Maybe one day I’ll go back and read those last couple of pages. Maybe.

Book Tag: Classic Book Tag, blog post by Aspasia S. Bissas

A classic you haven’t read

I have it– I just haven’t read it yet (the downside of having a sizable TBR pile).

Book Tag: Classic Book Tag, blog post by Aspasia S. Bissas

 

A classic you want to read

Considered the world’s first novel (and written by a woman), and yet I somehow never heard of it until recently. The Tale of Genji is now on my short list of must-reads (which is actually still pretty long, now that I think of it).

Book Tag: Classic Book Tag, blog post by Aspasia S. Bissas

A classic you’ve read multiple times

Did you know that you lose your Canadian citizenship if you haven’t read Anne of Green Gables? Okay, maybe not, but if you haven’t read this classic, you’re missing out. Sorry.

Book Tag: Classic Book Tag, blog post by Aspasia S. Bissas

 

Wondering what sort of books get written by English Majors who warp their minds reading a dubious mix of classics, horror, and fantasy? Click to find out…

Books by Aspasia S. Bissas

Love Lies Bleeding: SmashwordsBarnes & NobleKoboApple Books, Amazon
Blood Magic: SmashwordsBarnes & NobleKoboApple Books
Tooth & Claw: SmashwordsBarnes & NobleKoboApple Books

If you prefer a good paperback to an ebook, order Love Lies Bleeding from Bookshop – a portion of each sale goes directly to independent bookstores, as well as to myself. Thank you for supporting indie! ♥

 

Cheers,

Aspasía S. Bissas

Visiting Provence: Lavender Fields

One of my longtime dreams was to visit the lavender fields of Provence. In my mind, nothing could be more romantic; it was like a fairytale you could experience, something magical. And in 2015 I was lucky enough to finally be able to go. With surreal blue skies, cypress trees, castles, hills, Roman structures (some still in use so they can’t be called ruins), and, of course, lavender fields, Provence really is magical. When I was there my guide (Elodie of Provence Authentic) told me the fields are disappearing as farmers replace them with more profitable grapevines, which would be like Paris taking down the Eiffel tower to put up highrises. If you ever have a chance to visit the Luberon, the region where these fields were located, take it– while the lavender, and so much of the magic, is still there.

Visiting Provence, Lavender Fields, blog post by Aspasia S. Bissas

Visiting Provence, Lavender Fields, blog post by Aspasia S. Bissas

Visiting Provence, Lavender Fields, blog post by Aspasia S. Bissas

Visiting Provence, Lavender Fields, blog post by Aspasia S. Bissas

By the way, the smell was incredible. Forget whatever you think lavender smells like– there’s nothing like an entire sun-warmed field of these flowers.

In the next photo, you can just make out a castle on the hill in the background. Apparently it once belonged to the Marquis de Sade. When I was there it was owned by designer Pierre Cardin, who was raising money to restore it. I wonder how that went…

Visiting Provence, Lavender Fields, blog post by Aspasia S. Bissas
The flowers in this field haven’t quite opened yet. Lavender blooms in the Luberon from June until August, depending on location and type of lavender.
Visiting Provence, Lavender Fields, blog post by Aspasia S. Bissas
The farm’s name, “La Savonnade” means soap. By the way, “lavender” comes from the French “lavendre,” meaning to wash.
Visiting Provence, Lavender Fields, blog post by Aspasia S. Bissas
Mallow flowers among the lavender.

Visiting Provence, Lavender Fields, blog post by Aspasia S. Bissas

Visiting Provence, Lavender Fields, blog post by Aspasia S. Bissas
Surrounded by lavender fields is the lush green garden of the world’s luckiest homeowner. I wonder how they feel about unexpected houseguests…

Some local wildlife…

Visiting Provence, Lavender Fields, blog post by Aspasia S. Bissas

Visiting Provence, Lavender Fields, blog post by Aspasia S. Bissas

Visiting Provence, Lavender Fields, blog post by Aspasia S. Bissas
Before we left, we moved l’escargot off the road to more pleasant surroundings.

Have you visited any lavender fields, in France or anywhere else? Share in the comments…

Want to read more about France? Download my FREE story Tooth & Claw, set in early 1900s Marseille, and inspired by actual events (there aren’t any lavender fields, but there are vampires.)

Tooth & Claw, free short story by Aspasia S. Bissas

 Smashwords Barnes & Noble Kobo Apple Books

Further Reading

Visiting Provence: Carpentras

Vampire’s Garden: Lavender

Note: All photos in this post are © Aspasía S. Bissas. They were originally shared on my other blog Whimsy Bower (click to see more photos there).

Cheers,

Aspasía S. Bissas

 

What to Do when Your Plot Falls Apart

What to Do When Your Plot Falls Apart, blog post by Aspasia S. Bissas
Photo by Anna Shvets on Pexels.com

Imagine this: you’ve written the first (or second, or third…) draft of a novel and it’s going well. You’re editing and rewriting at a good pace, happy with your progress. But suddenly the realization hits you that a major plot point of your book is all wrong. For whatever reason a part of your story– maybe even one the entire book hinges on– no longer works. Now what?

This happened to me. I wasn’t happy with the ending of my current book and I wasn’t sure why. Then the crushing awareness that it was all wrong and had to go. Not only did I have no idea how to change it, but any changes I did make would have major repercussions for the next book too. Cue the panic.

I think it’s safe to say most writers experience this situation at some point, but if it happens to you it can be disheartening to the point of making you want to give up. If you’re suffering a plot fail, don’t worry. Despite the initial panic and frustration, there are things you can do to help you through it.

Take a Break: It doesn’t need to be a long break. Spend a few hours or a few days focusing on other things. Give your mind a rest from writing while your subconscious keeps thinking about it. Before you know it you’ll be coming up with new ideas and solutions without even trying.

Brainstorm: If the thought of ignoring your writing (even temporarily) stresses you, then brainstorming might be more your style. Try these brainstorming techniques for writers and keep working on the issue until you figure it out.

Think About It: Is there actually a problem with your story? Sometimes writers are convinced their book is terrible when the real issue is anxiety or insecurity. Maybe your plot needs only minor tweaking– or maybe it’s fine as is. Take a deep breath and a step back before considering whether the problem is your plot or your perception.

Talk it Out: Find someone you trust and tell them about it. Explain your concern with what you’ve already written and see what they think. Getting a second (or third) opinion can be really helpful, and sometimes simply saying things out loud is enough to trigger solutions. Don’t forget writers’ groups and forums– they can be invaluable sources of advice and support.

Hire an Editing Service: Editors can do more than check your spelling. Many offer services such as story consultation or manuscript critique. If you’re stuck and nothing else is helping, professional help might be the key.

As for myself, a combination of taking a break, thinking about it, and talking it out helped me overcome my plot issues. My book isn’t done yet, but at least it’s back on track.

How do you get through when your plot is causing you problems? Share in the comments.

love lies bleeding, blood magic, tooth & claw, books by Aspasia S. Bissas
Interested in seeing what I’ve written so far? Download one of my books…

Love Lies Bleeding: SmashwordsBarnes & NobleKoboApple Books, Amazon
Blood Magic: SmashwordsBarnes & NobleKoboApple Books
Tooth & Claw: SmashwordsBarnes & NobleKoboApple Books

If you prefer a good paperback to an ebook, order Love Lies Bleeding from Bookshop – a portion of each sale goes directly to independent bookstores, as well as to myself. Thank you for supporting indie! ♥

Cheers,

Aspasía S. Bissas