Interview with Rita Lee Chapman

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I’m pleased to post my first author interview, with mystery author Rita Lee Chapman (http://ritaleechapman.com). Welcome, Rita!

Thank you, Aspasia, for inviting me to your blog. It is lovely to have this opportunity
to talk to your readers.

Thanks for being here. Why don’t you start by telling us a bit about yourself?

I have lived most of my life in Australia, but I was born in London and migrated to
Australia in my early twenties. Before I retired I had started writing but never finished a novel. Of course in those days it was written on a typewriter so it required much more planning in terms of the storyline and also the formatting. It is so easy now with computers to turn paragraphs around or even to move whole chapters. I find the editing and formatting much harder and more time-consuming than the writing.

Editing is a chore for me, as well (I think many authors would agree). When did you write your first book?

It wasn’t until I retired and moved from Sydney to Queensland that I finished my first book, Missing in Egypt. This became Book 1 in the Anna Davies Mystery Series, followed by Missing at Sea and Missing in London. In between I wrote Dangerous Associations, a crime mystery, and Winston – A Horse’s Tale, one for horse lovers from teenagers upwards.

You’ve accomplished a lot since you retired. What do you do when you’re not writing?

I play tennis, walk on our lovely beaches or around the river or lakes, and swim. My husband and I are lucky to have a great circle of friends through our tennis club and spend many hours socialising, taking it in turns to cook for each other. We also enjoy travelling around Europe and this year drove around the South of France exploring the Loire Valley, the Dordogne, La Rochelle, Nice, Marseille and most places in between! Horses are still my passion, although I no longer ride.

Wow–can you take me on your next vacation? Where can readers find your books?

Missing_in_Egypt_Cover

Missing in Egypt
Book 1 in the Anna Davies Mystery Series

Amazon
Large Print
Smashwords

Missing At Sea Cover

Missing at Sea
Book #2 in the Anna Davies Mystery Series

Amazon
Large Print
Smashwords

Missing_in_London_Cover_

Missing in London
Book #3 in the Anna Davies Mystery Series

Smashwords
Amazon
Large Print

 

Dangerous Associations:

Amazon
Smashwords
Large Print

 

Cheers, Rita, for being part of my blog and giving my readers a chance to get to know you! Find out more about Rita and her books here.

IWD: Women in Writing

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A recent article in Bustle shares research from a new study showing female representation in fiction was better in the Victorian era than now. My instant reaction was disbelief, but as I thought about it, it’s not really that surprising. Based on my own (highly unscientific) experiences and observations, I’ve noticed that:

  • Publishing jobs tend to be low paying, are overwhelmingly held by women–and the women still almost always get paid less than the men in equivalent positions (more here).
  • Female writers tend to be taken less seriously than men, and their careers suffer for it. Don’t believe me? See here, here, or here, for just a few examples.
  • The genres in which women predominate are looked down on (this article discusses genre prejudice in general, but check the #1 and #2 most hated genres listed).
  • All difficulties are magnified for queer, trans, and POC women writers. For example, they’re largely excluded in genres dominated by straight white women.
  • Only women and girls seem to face mass derision for their reading preferences. Perhaps you yourself have encountered the hate for Twilight or 50 Shades of Grey. Yes, neither of these are literary masterpieces, but the last time I checked, not every book enjoyed by or written by men is pure gold either. Yet I can’t think of a time when men have been criticized on a mass scale for their fandom of a particular book.
  • The women writing about this topic are probably less likely to be believed and listened to than this man writing about the same topic.

On this International Women’s Day, I hope everyone will spare some time to think about the difficulties–past and present–faced by women everywhere, and more importantly, to do something about it.

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