Book Tag: Rapid Fire Book Tag

Book Tag: Rapid Fire Book Tag blog post by Aspasia S. Bissas
Photo by Kehn Hermano on Pexels.com

How is everyone holding up? It’s funny how as soon as you know you shouldn’t do something, you suddenly want to do it. As an introvert, self isolation isn’t too far from how I live anyway, but now that I know I shouldn’t leave the house– well, the world outside my door suddenly seems so much more enticing (not to worry– I’m staying home).

I’m keeping busy with reading (The Light Fantastic by Terry Pratchett), writing/editing, playing games, packing (even though the move is on hold until…?), crocheting, and spending way too much time on Netflix and YouTube. What are you doing to entertain yourself?

It’s been a while since I’ve done a book tag, so I grabbed this one from A Geek Girl’s Guide. Feel free to answer the questions in the comments below, or leave a link to your own post…

Book Tag: Rapid Fire Book Tag blog post by Aspasia S. Bissas
Photo by Emre Can on Pexels.com

1. E-Book or Physical Book?

Physical books for collecting, but an e-reader for reading. (I love physical books but my strained eyes like having the option of increasing the font size, and my anxiety likes not having to worry about accidentally bending covers, spilling on pages, or cracking spines.)

2. Paperback or Hardback?

Paperback for reading, hardback for collecting.

3. Online or In-Store Book Shopping?

Online. I love browsing in an actual bookstore, but they can also be overwhelming.

Book Tag: Rapid Fire Book Tag blog post by Aspasia S. Bissas
Photo by Min An on Pexels.com

4. Trilogies or Series?

Don’t care as long as the story is still good.

5. Heroes or Villains?

A complicated hero.

6. A book you want everyone to read?

Mine, of course. Did I mention that Love Lies Bleeding is available free for the first time? Click on the picture or go here for more info.

Aspasia S. Bissas's books: Love Lies Bleeding, Blood Magic, Tooth & Claw

7. Recommend an underrated book?

This Charming Man by Marian Keyes or Pinocchio: Vampire Slayer by Van Jensen.

8. The last book you finished

The Colour of Magic by Terry Pratchett.

9. The Last Book You Bought?

Mort by Terry Pratchett.

10. Weirdest Thing You’ve Used as a Bookmark?

Probably another book.

Book Tag: Rapid Fire Book Tag blog post by Aspasia S. Bissas
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11. Used Books: Yes or No?

Definitely.

12. Top Three Favourite Genres?

Fantasy (all sub genres), Magical Realism, Historical (really, it would be easier to list the genres I don’t like).

13. Borrow or Buy?

Mostly buy.

14. Characters or Plot?

Generally, I prefer characters.

Book Tag: Rapid Fire Book Tag blog post by Aspasia S. Bissas
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

15. Long or Short Books?

Long.

16. Long or Short Chapters?

Short (or long ones with breaks).

17. Name The First Three Books You Think Of…

The Stranger (Albert Camus), Fifth Business (Robertson Davies), Horton Hears a Who (Dr. Seuss).

18. Books That Make You Laugh or Cry?

Not sure if I’m supposed to give specific titles or just a general type of book, but the last book that made me cry was Elizabeth the Queen by Alison Weir. The last one that made me laugh was The Colour of Magic.

Book Tag: Rapid Fire Book Tag blog post by Aspasia S. Bissas
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19. Our World or Fictional Worlds?

A fictionalized (or past) version of our world.

20. Audiobooks: Yes or No?

Not for me (listening is too passive– I end up zoning out).

21. Do You Ever Judge a Book by its Cover?

Isn’t that the entire point of covers? Although a beautiful cover can definitely contain a terrible book.

Book Tag: Rapid Fire Book Tag blog post by Aspasia S. Bissas
Photo by Bruno Massao on Pexels.com

22. Book to Movie or Book to TV Adaptations?

Movie (they have better production values and shows start taking liberties with the story and characters once they’ve covered the source material– or even when they haven’t).

23. A Movie or TV Show You Preferred to its Book?

The Princess Bride (if I’d read the book first, I’d never have watched the movie).

24. Series or Standalones?

If it’s a great story that can’t be fully told in one book, then a series is great.

 

What do you think? What movie did you prefer to the book? Share in the comments…

Cheers,

Aspasía S. Bissas

Quote of the Day

Quote of the Day blog post by Aspasia S. Bissas
–Stephen Colbert

 

A reminder that all my ebooks are currently FREE. Lose touch with reality for a while…

Love Lies Bleeding: Smashwords, Barnes & Noble, Kobo, Apple Books

Blood Magic: Smashwords, Barnes & Noble, Kobo, Apple Books

Tooth & Claw: Smashwords, Barnes & Noble, Kobo, Apple Books

 

Aspasia S. Bissas's books: Love Lies Bleeding, Blood Magic, Tooth & Claw

If you prefer a good paperback to an ebook, then order Love Lies Bleeding from an independent bookshop and support small businesses when they need it most. Click here and scroll down for the full list of available online shops.

Cheers,

Aspasía S. Bissas

A Corona of Bees

A Corona of Bees, blog post by Aspasia S. Bissas
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

I have melissophobia– the fear of bees. I’ve suffered this intense fear since I was 3 or 4 years old, when a bumblebee chased me and wouldn’t leave me alone (eventually my sister told me to stand still, which I did, and the bee flew away, but the damage was done). If I see a bee now I keep my distance. If it’s flying near me I instinctively freeze in terror. If I can get inside I’ll walk as fast as I can without “provoking” it, all the while too afraid to look back to see if it’s following. If one gets in the house, I’ll hide in the farthest room with a door and wait until someone can come take care of it. The first time I realized I was having a panic attack was when I heard buzzing in the living room curtains (it turned out to be a fly). Basically, I react to bees the way other people react to axe murderers. My logical mind loves bees: they pollinate flowers; make delicious honey; and are symbols of orderliness, productivity, and a peaceful garden. But phobias aren’t logical, and on a deeper, baser, level within me, bees are the incarnation of danger and chaos. Even looking at the photo at the top of my post makes my stomach twist with anxiety.

Last night I had a nightmare about bees that wasn’t about bees at all.

It started when one of my cousins pointed out a swarm of bees in a tree. I knew we had to get out of there, so I started running. But my SO said we should find somewhere quiet to hide and let them pass us by. When I saw bees overtaking me as I ran, I knew he was right. I tried hiding.

The next thing I knew, my scalp was crawling (in the dream I could actually feel the physical sensations) and I heard buzzing. I asked my SO if they were on me and he said he would go get help. While I waited for what seemed like ages I tried to think of a way to get them off me. I kept moving near flowers, hoping they’d prefer the blossoms to me. But nothing I did helped, and they started moving down. They clustered around my eyes, ears, and mouth. They crawled down my neck and settled on my chest.

Suddenly my mom was there, smiling. My mom died 9 years ago, but has been visiting my dreams lately. She saw I was in distress (and I really was, having been crawling with bees in the dream for what seemed like hours) and took charge. Suddenly people were there trying to help. I woke up before the bees were removed, but the dream ended on a hopeful note, and I was confident the situation would get resolved.

I was covered in bees, but this was a dream about my anxieties over coronavirus (COVID-19).

The swarm of bees represents the virus: a massive danger off to the side that I didn’t immediately notice and then couldn’t get away from. Trying to hide from the bees is my self isolation (I have an underlying condition, so I need to avoid people as much as possible right now). Every time I hear the word “coronavirus” I’m reminded that corona means crown, so of course the bees started in my hair. Then they moved to my face, which is the area we’re constantly warned not to touch. From there to my chest, the part of the body the virus attacks. I hope the appearance of my mom means I’m being watched over. The hopeful note at the end gives me a little hope in real life too.

These are scary times. Nightmares are coming to life and threatening us all. But there’s still hope. Sometimes you can’t avoid being stung, but staying calm will help you get through it. And if you’re lucky, there’s still flowers and honey in the end.

A Corona of Bees, blog post by Aspasia S. Bissas

Because so many people are stuck at home right now I’ve decided to make the ebook of Love Lies Bleeding free for the next few weeks. Books can help us get through the worst situations, and hopefully my books can help you.

Get Them Free

Love Lies Bleeding: Smashwords, Barnes & Noble, Kobo, Apple Books

Blood Magic: Smashwords, Barnes & Noble, Kobo, Apple Books

Tooth & Claw: Smashwords, Barnes & Noble, Kobo, Apple Books

If you prefer a good paperback to an ebook, then order Love Lies Bleeding from an independent bookshop and support small businesses when they need it most. Click here and scroll down for the full list of available online shops.

Stay healthy ♥

Aspasía S. Bissas

 

 

IWD: Taking Credit

IWD: Taking Credit, blog post by Aspasia S. Bissas
Photo by Andrew Neel on Pexels.com

Some writers work for money. Some work for the sake of the art. But if there’s one thing just about all writers expect in return for their work, it’s credit. Unfortunately, this basic acknowledgement of a person’s contribution to the world isn’t always accorded to women.

The French writer Colette’s first husband, after encouraging her to pursue writing, went ahead and took credit for her work. At one point, when she refused to write more stories for him, he locked her in a room with nothing but a typewriter. Although Colette eventually divorced him and got back credit (after his death) for her popular Claudine series, her husband owned the copyright and she never saw a dime from the books, the stage adaptation, or the extensive Claudine-themed merchandise.

IWD: Taking Credit, blog post by Aspasia S. Bissas

“Anonymous,” a published author, recounts how at a meeting in Hollywood with actors and a showrunner (all male), her story was casually taken, altered just enough, and used for their own benefit without consideration or credit to her. They profited while she got nothing for her work. She is now forced to write as Anonymous because her ex-husband, also a writer, has been violent and is a threat.

IWD: Taking Credit, blog post by Aspasia S. Bissas

Zelda Fitzgerald, wife of F. Scott Fitzgerald (The Great Gatsby), has a reputation as a free-spirited (some would say wild) flapper who ended up “crazy.” As it happens, she was also a promising writer whose celebrated husband stole entire passages of her work, letters, and diaries to use in his own novels (he also helped himself to his friends’ words and experiences, and accused Zelda of writing about their marriage in her book before he could do the same in his). He may have spread rumours that she was mentally unfit and likely intentionally pushed her to a nervous breakdown. Today Zelda’s writing is hardly known, while F. Scott’s is required reading.

Sadly, these are only three examples of women not getting the credit they’re due. Throughout history women’s work– writing, as well as every other kind– has been diminished, ignored, sometimes destroyed. Men take credit for it without hesitation, as famously happened with scientist Rosalind Franklin. The women who create get buried and forgotten. On this International Women’s Day, take a moment to think of all the women throughout the centuries who have had their legacies taken by men who felt entitled to their credit.

Cheers,

Aspasía S. Bissas

 

Further Reading

The Life of French Writer Colette

Colette Only Shows a Sliver of Colette’s Eventual Love Life– Here’s the Rest

Famous Bis: Colette

This Side of Plagiarism

The First Flapper: Zelda Fitzgerald

#ThanksforTyping: the women behind famous male writers

16 Brilliant Women from History Who Got No Credit for Their Groundbreaking Work

Matilda Effect

“I Made that Bitch Famous”

11 Overlooked Women From History

 

 

Last Chance: Read an Ebook Week Sale

Read an Ebook Week at Smashwords! Get Love Lies Bleeding by Aspasia S. Bissas for 50% Off...

Smashwords’ 11th Annual Read An Ebook Sale ends tonight. It’s your last chance to get Love Lies Bleeding for only $1.50 (Tooth & Claw and Blood Magic are FREE).

Top 3 Reasons to Get Love Lies Bleeding Now

3. Support hard-working authors by buying, reading, and reviewing their books.

2. Love Lies Bleeding has great reviews. Check them out here, here, and here.

1. Where else can you be entertained for hours for only $1.50?

 

Get Love Lies Bleeding here.

Read an Ebook Week Sale: Love Lies Bleeding, Blood Magic, and Tooth & Claw by Aspasia S. Bissas

Read an Ebook Week Sale: Love Lies Bleeding by Aspasia S. Bissas is 50% Off

Cheers,

Aspasía S. Bissas