World Dracula Day

Happy World Dracula Day! Today we celebrate the anniversary of the first publication of Bram Stoker’s vampire standard Dracula. Many of us in English-speaking countries are familiar with Stoker’s creation, but how do other countries view the Count?

Drácula

dracula in spanish
https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=8848632
spanish dracula 2
Lobby Card

Drácula, a 1931 Spanish film adaptation of Stoker’s work, was filmed at night using the same sets as the 1931 English version starring Bela Lugosi. Because the Spanish crew got to see the English dailies every night, they had a chance to adjust camera angles and other details to produce what many fans believe is a superior film.

 

Evil of Dracula

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Evil of Dracula
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Toshio Kurosawa in Evil of Dracula.

Evil of Dracula (original title: Chi o suu bara “Bloodsucking Rose”) is the third part of a Japanese trilogy, known as the Bloodthirsty Trilogy, of Dracula adaptations (some more loosely adapted than others). In this version, the vampire bites his victims on the breast, rather than on the neck (hey, it was the 70s).

 

Dracula, the Musical

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Dracula, The Musical, poster in Seoul

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Dracula, The Musical, debuted in South Korea in 2014, starring Kim Jun-su in the titular role. Although based on a 2004 Broadway musical, the Korean version seems uniquely their own. This post has plenty of photos and info, including lyrics to one of the songs. Anyone else think North America could use a rebooted musical Dracula, including the pink hair?

 

Dracula Adult Panto

dracula adult panto
Dracula Adult Panto in South Africa

Another stage adaptation, Dracula Adult Panto brings the gender-bent Count(ess) to South Africa, along with a dash of humour and an LGBT+ twist. At the end of the show, the venue transforms into a dance floor, and attendees spend the rest of the night partying.

 

Tomb of Dracula aka Κόμης Δράκουλας

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Tomb of Dracula, Greek version

Tomb of Dracula, Greek version

Not a unique adaptation, but I thought the Greek edition of Marvel’s Tomb of Dracula was worth a share. Interestingly, his title can translate to either Count or Earl (you’ve heard of Earl Grey–now tremble before Earl Dracula!) I wish my parents had thought to pick me up a few copies of these when I was a kid learning Greek; alas, my Greek-language education remained pitifully vampire free.

Which is your favourite non-English version of Dracula? Is there another one you think I should know about? Share in the comments…

Cheers,

Aspasia S. Bissas

10 Replies to “World Dracula Day”

    1. Yes, it is true, Lugosi was indeed buried in his costume from Dracula. It was his life defining role, though he was a star on the Hungarian stage. When he came to America he fell into typecasting, largely due to his strong accent, and never escaped it.

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      1. Sadly, no. The resurgence of classic horror came a few years after he passed away. At the time of his death those films were considered fodder for humor such as the Abbott and Costello movies. His last work was with the director Ed Wood who was not as cool then as he became much, much later. Lugosi was treated for morphine addiction at a sanitarium late in his life and relapsed never to recover.

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  1. Great post! My first recommendation, if you haven’t seen it is Werner Herzog’s Nosfertu with the brilliant Klaus Kinski. The visuals alone are worth seeing the film and it’s sequel. I thought El Conde Dracula with Christopher Lee as filmed in Spanish, but i can only find an English version. Perhaps, my mind is going with that one. I’ll give this some thought.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks! I have seen Nosferatu and was considering including it–now I regret that I didn’t. Can’t help you with El Conde Dracula, I’m afraid, but I did discover that finding info on non-English versions of Dracula was not at all easy to come by.

      Liked by 1 person

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